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CONTENTS:

  • Comforts of Civilian Home


  • Period Eyeglasses with original Tin Case

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    These are a nice pair of period eyeglasses with the common sliding, or adjustable, ear pieces. Original fine black string to keep from falling off face. Numbered "18". THey come in an original tin box. Nice representative item of the eyeglasses worn by Civil War soldiers.
     
    CDV of Famous Civil War Actress: Maggie Mitchell

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    We show many photographs of soldiers in our museum. But a tremendous number of images were taken during the 1860's of civilians, family members, politicians, statesmen, performers and even inanimate objects in museums. Photographs was new in the early 1850's and still a "miracle" in people's eyes, but with the advent of the paper & cardboard CDV in the 1850's, it was now generally affordable. This is an image of a famous actress of the times: Maggie MItchell. She still is a good-looker by our modern standards. Most likely, Civil War soldiers would bring a few images of pretty ladies with them to war for romantic inspiration. There were many songs and poems about "the girl back home..." Occasionally, a CDV of a young lady in a swimsuit or sleeping garments found its way into camp and caused a stir as it circulated. These were daring enough to show bare knees!!! (Talk about out-of-control!!!) This image has a New York backmark. Isn't it a shame that in the 1860's there were no recordings or film invented yet in order for us to see or hear this lovely Maggie performing?
     
    Lucy Frantz, 1863: Remembered.

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    This is a stunning ruby ambrotype from 1863 of a young lady named Lucy Frantz. Except for this wonderfully-executed image on glass she might otherwise be totally forgotten. But here she is again! I always find the ambrotype technique to yield images of the most stunning depth and feeling. Look at that detail! Besides her name and the date, Lucy scribble a message in pencil behind her image: "The grass is green, the rose is red, hear my name when I am dead." Lucy is clearly remembered now, seen in her sumptuous black dress and fine jewelry. Though young, she appears to be wearing a wedding band and since the date is 1863, could likely be the young wife of a Civil War soldier. This image came from a Lehighton, Pa, Mahoning Valley estate auction. This coal mining region of Pennsylvania has a strong history of Quakers, Pennsylvania Dutch, Amish, and Native Americans. Someday I'll trace Lucy's records.
     
    Harden's Express Shipping Decal to 6th Maine Soldier

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    Many gifts, supplies and even foodstuffs were forwarded to soldier's by Courier's, U.S. Mail and private Express Services. Shown here is a fancy shipping decal from Harden's Express, dated May 31, 1862, to J.E.Stewart of Co. G., 6th Maine Inf. His residence was Columbia, Maine. He was 23 years old. And he enlisted on 7/15/1861 as a private, being mustered-out on 8/15/1864 at Portland, ME. Someone was shipping a package to him in Williamsburg, Va. It bears great graphics in green ink as well a few disclaimers concerning shipped items that are connected with the Army. A nice 9" by 6" size
     
    CW Period Personnal Poetry Book by a Gal

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    A black book which was hand-written in sections by "Miss A. Learn" during 1860's and 70's. Not only are there quotes and passages from famous authors but also her own sonnets and poems. About 85 written pages with others left blank. One passage in French! It's neat to read the feelings of a woman from the time period of the Civil War. Inks a bit faded, few pages loose, and fancy old script sometimes some work to decipher, but very cool.
     
    CW Period Box of Bone & Wood Dominoes

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    This is a full set of 28 Civil War Period Bone and Wood Dominoes. Comes in it's original wooden slide-top box. A popular game amongst troopers in camp on both sides of the picket line.
     
    1864 Engraving: Rival Charms

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    This engraving comes from an original 1864 bound edition of Peterson's Magazine which was published monthly in Philadelphia. The publication was very popular, containg romantic stories, wise essays, thoughtful poems, cooking hints, medicinal advice, sewing patterns for outfits, French fashion images and generic engravings. These are the actual pages that a Civil War wife was likely to be reading while her husband was engulfed elsewhere in greatest peril. Notice how fashion is important in any time period of generation...
     
    April 1864 Hand-Colored Fashion Plate

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    This engraving comes from an original 1864 bound edition of Peterson's Magazine which was published monthly in Philadelphia. The publication was very popular, containg romantic stories, wise essays, thoughtful poems, cooking hints, medicinal advice, sewing patterns for outfits, French fashion images and generic engravings.
     
    Ticket to the Great Central Fair

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    During the Civil War, the Union had large "Fairs" in bigger cities to support the cause of the troops. Many displays of technology, arts, and commercial goods were exhibited in large buildings or huge tents. Some of the proceeds were channeled toward relief for medical needs of soldiers, diability for the wounded, meals for visiting troopers and orphans' funds. There were often huge walls of captured enemy flags and weapons to amaze the curious civilians. This shows a $5.00 Season Pass to the Great Central Fair held during the Civil War. A Civil War period Advertising card also was discovered with the Fair ticket. Salesmen were happy to use the Events as a way to inform large crowds of their goods.
     
    Soldier's Button made into a woman's hairpin

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    Women of Civil War Soldiers were very proud of their men on both sides. They often wore small photos of them in broaches upon their dresses. But a more interesting momento of a man away at battle was wearing one of his uniform buttoms as a large stickpin which held up long hair in buns at the time. The is a Union General service button made into such a lady's hairpin.
     
    A Rotating Mourning Photo Pin

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    What a unique jewelry design idea from the Civil War! A pin that actually pivots: one side showing a disc of black "jet" to indicate mourning~ the other side when flipped around showing the small tintype image of the beloved soldier under a piece of beveled glass. Thus, the relative or sweetheart could wear either the picture side or the black side forward. The lightly decorated metal frame is possibly gold. Pin at back holds it in place as a brooch. It is possible that popping out the glass over the tintype might reveal the name of the soldier or a lock of his hair... but I have left it underopened out of respect... and because I like the mystery of it!
     
    Friendship Locket

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    This attractive double-sided locket has a flip-open cover on each side like an old pocket watch. Dating from the 1850's period, it contains a daguerratype of a young gentleman on one side and a colorful rose image that says "From a friend" on the other. It is an attractive piece of jewelry with a finely detailed floral border. Worn from a chain or heavy pin by a lady of the period just prior to our Civil War. 1 3/8" across. Not for sale.
     
    Steam Vessel Inspectors Badge

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    U.S. Steam Vessels Inspector's badge is 2-1/8" tall by 1-5/8" wide. This badge was made of silver and hand engraved at the U.S. Mint. They are very rare. The design of the badge is topped with a U.S. 13 star shield and a pair of banners "INSPECTOR" and "STEAM" | "2" | "VESSELS" that frame a scene of a paddlewheel steam boat with rigging. The Steamboat Act of May 30, 1852 authorized the appointment of nine supervising inspectors and also authorized appointment of local inspectors. They worked under the Department of the Treasury. The Act of February 28, 1871 actually created the Steamboat Inspection Service, which was also part of Treasury.
     
    Small Gold Locket with Tins of Soldier and his Miss

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    This is very very cool. A tiny gold-toned locket of a book which opens to reveal tiny tintypes of a Union private and his lady. There is an engraved scene of a church on the outside covers. The size is small at: 7/8" by 5/8".
     
    Civil War era doll

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    This is a Civil War era child's doll with a lovely painted porcelain face. The arms and legs are a bisque type white china. The body is canvas over sawdust. It some tiny holes but overall extremely sturdy. No dress. Almost 12 inches high. This is the most common type of doll seen in photos of children from CW era. How many survived this nice?
     
    CW era woman dressed as a Vivandiere

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    Very sharp cdv of a young woman dressed like a vivandiere. She's wearing a short skirt with trim. Short pants or pantalettes & stockings underneath. White shirt with short jacket. Hat with feathers. Holding a U.S. flag. She also has a small pistol tucked in her belt. Hat, jacket, flag, belt, trim & buttons down her blouse have been tinted a purple color. Written on back of card is: Miss Bailey. No backmark. Size is 2 3/8 x 3 3/8". A 'vivandiere' is a French term that was used to describe women who were attached to military units as sutlers or canteen bearers.
     
    Unique Civil War Utensil Kit

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    This is a Civil War era utensil kit. Fork and spoon are marked with hallmarks. Knife is marked: George Wostenholms. Some cracks in handles. Chip on handle of the spoon. The leather case shows wear. Case stand approx 6" high and 3" across base. The is a unique type of custom kit carried to war by a well-heeled soldier.